Medicare Part B is the part of Original Medicare that offers benefits for outpatient services and is one of the most essential components of the federal health program. When you enroll in Medicare Part B, you are responsible for paying a monthly premium.

Paying the monthly premium allows your Medicare Part B to remain active each month. Additionally, this premium changes each year. Below, we discuss the Medicare Part B premium in 2022.

What is the Medicare Part B Premium in 2022?

Each month, Medicare beneficiaries who have Medicare Part B coverage are responsible for paying the Medicare Part B premium. In 2022, the Medicare Part B base premium is $170.10 but can be as high as $578.30 for those with a higher income.

When you enroll in Medicare Part B, you become responsible for paying the monthly premium. Unlike Medicare Part A, Medicare Part B is not premium-free for beneficiaries. To receive Medicare Part B coverage each month, you must satisfy the premium.

Each year, the Medicare Part B premium changes based on several outlying factors. So, you can expect to pay a different premium starting each January.

How is the Medicare Part B Premium Calculated?

The Medicare Part B premium is calculated based on your income and tax filing status from two years prior to the current year. Each fall, the base Medicare premium and deductible costs are released for the following year.

However, if your income exceeds a set amount, you will receive an Income Related Monthly Adjustment Amount (IRMAA) in addition to your monthly Medicare Part B premium.

To notice a difference in your premium, your annual income would need to exceed $91,000 when filing individually or $182,000 when filing jointly.

Individual tax returnJoint tax returnFile married & separate tax return2022 monthly premium
$91,000 or less$182,000 or less$91,000 or less$170.10
above $91,000 up to $114,000above $182,000 up to $228,000N/A$238.10
above $114,000 up to $142,000above $228,000 up to $284,000N/A$340.20
above $142,000 up to $170,000above $284,000 up to $340,000N/A$442.30
above $170,000 and less than $500,000above $340,000 and less than $750,000above $91,000 and less than $409,000$544.30
$500,000 or above$750,000 or above$409,000 or above$578.30

Suppose you delayed Medicare Part B without creditable coverage in place. In that case, you will be responsible for paying an additional Medicare Part B late enrollment penalty on top of your monthly premium (and IRMAA amount if applicable). Thus, it is important to enroll in Medicare Part B when you are first eligible.

How to Pay the Medicare Part B Premium

There are several ways to pay your monthly Medicare Part B premium. The easiest way to pay the premium is by enrolling in Social Security or Railroad Retirement Board benefits. If you receive either of these income benefits, your Medicare Part B premium will automatically deduct from your benefit check each month.

If you are not receiving Social Security or Railroad Retirement Board benefits – or if you would rather pay yourself – you can opt-in for a quarterly bill that you will receive via mail once every three months.

When you receive a quarterly bill, you pay for three months’ premiums at one time. You can pay this bill by mail or online through your MyMedicare account. 

How to Receive Assistance with the Medicare Part B Premium

If you are new to Medicare and have concerns about how you will afford your monthly premium – or if you are currently receiving Medicare Part B and struggle with the cost of your monthly premium, there are options. Several Medicare Savings Programs provide opportunities to receive help paying your monthly premium.

Contact your local Social Security office to check your eligibility for available Medicare Savings Programs.

Jagger Esch

Medicare Expert

Jagger Esch is the Medicare expert for MedicareFAQ and the founder, president, and CEO of Elite Insurance Partners and MedicareFAQ.com. Since the inception of his first company in 2012, he has been dedicated to helping those eligible for Medicare by providing them with resources to educate themselves on all their Medicare options. He is featured in many publications as well as writes regularly for other expert columns regarding Medicare.